"Too many people assume that they have the right to ride the horse without respect for some proper communication. They have the right to this authority without granting any authority to the horse; without any reverence for the process; without any willingness to be ordered...

Looking for a unique internship in dressage? Everyday can be a masterclass – it is up to you. We are passionate about sharing dressage with riders who have an interest in theory as well as riding. As Alois Podhajsky said, “there must be a balance between theory and riding. Without this balance, riders go from one system to another with no understanding of biomechanics or history. They just ride each day, making mistakes that have already been proven to be ineffective.”

Here we see Rose and her Hanoverian Sparrow practicing one-tempis flying changes. When you start training and practicing flying changes, your horse probably knows shoulder in, haunches in, all the lateral work. It knows to move over from the leg aids. If you continue to use strong lower legs you will almost certainly get crooked changes. You must teach the changes off of your hips and seat. The horse follows the rider's hips like a child skipping in a straight line. One of the reasons straight changes are so important is that they can be proof of the horse and rider's connection through the back and seat, and not a trick off the cue of heel and spur.

Judging from my mailbox, dressage riders seemed perplexed about how competition judges are currently evaluating some horses’ piaffes at the international level. What is high quality and what is faulty? In this article, I will address two major faults in piaffes of popular riders that have appeared in recent performances, and seem to be confusing viewers.